Gramps Workflow Ideas

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Re: Gramps Workflow Ideas

ACProctor
No, Ron, if you find an image, or transcript, and you record the associated digital identifier then the provider should have a URL to goes directly to
it, e.g. http://example.com/item-id=<identifier>. You could then record this URL in your Gramps tree, or in a formal written citation somewhere.
Currently, when citing a digital image/transcript, all you can reliably do it give the main URL of the provider, plus a bunch of search criteria, ...
and hope for the best if someone tries to revisit it.

If you think about it, it's not fundamentally different to when you cite a document found in an archive: the archival code specifies the location of
the actual item. You're not forced to go look them up in the index cards or some other index.

...anyway, that would be the ideal. I think Brexit has more chance of getting agreed than this idea  :-)

Tony

On 30/04/2019 11:52, Ron Johnson wrote:

>
> Everything you write is true, but doesn't it require all researchers to know about these digital identifiers beforehand?
>
> On 4/30/19 3:51 AM, Tony Proctor wrote:
>> Let me clarify a little, Peter. The codes that the TNA document are archival ones, used for organisation of their materials. They are not digital
>> identifiers, and the fact that UK census search engines can accept them as search criteria is (I believe) stipulated by TNA, but it wasn't part of
>> their specific design.
>>
>> Online resources should, ideally, be treated as "digital archives", and the providers should define permanent digital identifiers that could be
>> used to locate the same materials over and again, directly and without having to always go through a search engine . Being forced to use a search
>> engine to find the same digital material as you found last time leaves you open to databases having changed with new records added or contents
>> merged/divided. Digital identifiers could also distinguish transcriptions from images, and even different versions of each (e.g. if an error is
>> fixed in one of them). Sorry ... another rant over ... more details at https://parallax-viewpoint.blogspot.com/2016/12/impermanent-links.html.
>> Maybe one day archives and IT people will have a similar approach.
>>
>> Tony
>>
>



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Re: Gramps Workflow Ideas

Ron Johnson
On 4/30/19 6:55 AM, Tony Proctor wrote:
No, Ron, if you find an image, or transcript, and you record the associated digital identifier then the provider should have a URL to goes directly to it, e.g. http://example.com/item-id=<identifier>. You could then record this URL in your Gramps tree, or in a formal written citation somewhere.

And hope that the web site doesn't get reorganized some time in the future

Currently, when citing a digital image/transcript, all you can reliably do it give the main URL of the provider, plus a bunch of search criteria, ... and hope for the best if someone tries to revisit it.

This is why I never rely on URLs in citations.  Attached media is the only way to be sure.

If you think about it, it's not fundamentally different to when you cite a document found in an archive: the archival code specifies the location of the actual item. You're not forced to go look them up in the index cards or some other index.

...anyway, that would be the ideal. I think Brexit has more chance of getting agreed than this idea  :-)

Tony

On 30/04/2019 11:52, Ron Johnson wrote:

Everything you write is true, but doesn't it require all researchers to know about these digital identifiers beforehand?

On 4/30/19 3:51 AM, Tony Proctor wrote:
Let me clarify a little, Peter. The codes that the TNA document are archival ones, used for organisation of their materials. They are not digital identifiers, and the fact that UK census search engines can accept them as search criteria is (I believe) stipulated by TNA, but it wasn't part of their specific design.

Online resources should, ideally, be treated as "digital archives", and the providers should define permanent digital identifiers that could be used to locate the same materials over and again, directly and without having to always go through a search engine . Being forced to use a search engine to find the same digital material as you found last time leaves you open to databases having changed with new records added or contents merged/divided. Digital identifiers could also distinguish transcriptions from images, and even different versions of each (e.g. if an error is fixed in one of them). Sorry ... another rant over ... more details at https://parallax-viewpoint.blogspot.com/2016/12/impermanent-links.html. Maybe one day archives and IT people will have a similar approach.

Tony





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Re: Gramps Workflow Ideas

Peter Merchant
On 30/04/2019 13:13, Ron Johnson wrote:
On 4/30/19 6:55 AM, Tony Proctor wrote:
No, Ron, if you find an image, or transcript, and you record the associated digital identifier then the provider should have a URL to goes directly to it, e.g. http://example.com/item-id=<identifier>. You could then record this URL in your Gramps tree, or in a formal written citation somewhere.

And hope that the web site doesn't get reorganized some time in the future

Currently, when citing a digital image/transcript, all you can reliably do it give the main URL of the provider, plus a bunch of search criteria, ... and hope for the best if someone tries to revisit it.

This is why I never rely on URLs in citations.  Attached media is the only way to be sure.


That is where I am coming from I think. I have my file naming convention that I use to link media to my Gramps element. What I now need to do is add the code from wherever to the source description of the media. As I noted initially, a lot of retrospective work.

How do you identify your stored media? 

As a note of course I have a problem when my brother sends me a scanned photo of my great grandfather called cimg3495 and the reverse cimg3496- no date and just my fathers writing on the reverse saying 'grandfather' but not saying which one!

Peter




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Re: Gramps Workflow Ideas

Ron Johnson
On 4/30/19 8:06 AM, Peter Merchant wrote:
On 30/04/2019 13:13, Ron Johnson wrote:
On 4/30/19 6:55 AM, Tony Proctor wrote:
No, Ron, if you find an image, or transcript, and you record the associated digital identifier then the provider should have a URL to goes directly to it, e.g. http://example.com/item-id=<identifier>. You could then record this URL in your Gramps tree, or in a formal written citation somewhere.

And hope that the web site doesn't get reorganized some time in the future

Currently, when citing a digital image/transcript, all you can reliably do it give the main URL of the provider, plus a bunch of search criteria, ... and hope for the best if someone tries to revisit it.

This is why I never rely on URLs in citations.  Attached media is the only way to be sure.


That is where I am coming from I think. I have my file naming convention that I use to link media to my Gramps element. What I now need to do is add the code from wherever to the source description of the media. As I noted initially, a lot of retrospective work.

How do you identify your stored media? 


Typically it's the hated YYYY_<name>_<description>.jpg format.

As a note of course I have a problem when my brother sends me a scanned photo of my great grandfather called cimg3495 and the reverse cimg3496- no date and just my fathers writing on the reverse saying 'grandfather' but not saying which one!


For something like that, I'd name them something like (pretending that your father's name is George and that he was born in 1930):
Merchant,_George1930,_grandfather_of.jpg
Merchant,_George1930,_grandfather_of_(reverse).jpg


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