Tools for the visualition of Gramps data.

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Tools for the visualition of Gramps data.

John W. Kitz-3
Hi,

This is probably a question for the more seasoned Gramps users out there;
one of the features of Gramps is that it can be used to store location
information as it relates to other information stored in Gramps, such as
data representative of time through the recording of life events such as
births, marriages, deaths, burials, etc.

Are there any users that have experience with and can thus recommend any,
preferably free and relatively easy to use, software that can be used to
visualize such data e.g. as it pertains to the propagation of a specific
last name in time within e.g. a city or a country or to the migration of
individuals belonging to a certain group (individuals with a similar name)
in time and space?

Regards, Jk.


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Re: Tools for the visualition of Gramps data.

Doug-11
On 27/01/17 15:56, John W. Kitz wrote:

> Hi,
>
> This is probably a question for the more seasoned Gramps users out there;
> one of the features of Gramps is that it can be used to store location
> information as it relates to other information stored in Gramps, such as
> data representative of time through the recording of life events such as
> births, marriages, deaths, burials, etc.
>
> Are there any users that have experience with and can thus recommend any,
> preferably free and relatively easy to use, software that can be used to
> visualize such data e.g. as it pertains to the propagation of a specific
> last name in time within e.g. a city or a country or to the migration of
> individuals belonging to a certain group (individuals with a similar name)
> in time and space?
>
> Regards, Jk.

I have experience with the problem but not with any software
that can quickly solve it for you.
When I was doing this, it was with a much earlier version of
gramps and it involved a lot of manual work. Now that things
have moved on, maybe others can help.

I'd just comment that gramps in any case is not well
designed for dealing with all people with the same surname
as a group, when it comes to things like the Narweb report.
You can get round that with a kludge, for example, I created
an imaginary person called "<my-surname> SURNAME" and
attached dates and maps to him.

Doug

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Re: Tools for the visualition of Gramps data.

John W. Kitz-3
Doug,

On 2017-01-31 15:55, Doug wrote:

> On 27/01/17 15:56, John W. Kitz wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> This is probably a question for the more seasoned Gramps users out
>> there;
>> one of the features of Gramps is that it can be used to store location
>> information as it relates to other information stored in Gramps, such
>> as
>> data representative of time through the recording of life events such
>> as
>> births, marriages, deaths, burials, etc.
>>
>> Are there any users that have experience with and can thus recommend
>> any,
>> preferably free and relatively easy to use, software that can be used
>> to
>> visualize such data e.g. as it pertains to the propagation of a
>> specific
>> last name in time within e.g. a city or a country or to the migration
>> of
>> individuals belonging to a certain group (individuals with a similar
>> name)
>> in time and space?
>>
>> Regards, Jk.
>
> I have experience with the problem but not with any software that can
> quickly solve it for you.
> When I was doing this, it was with a much earlier version of gramps
> and it involved a lot of manual work. Now that things have moved on,
> maybe others can help.
>
> I'd just comment that gramps in any case is not well designed for
> dealing with all people with the same surname as a group, when it
> comes to things like the Narweb report.
> You can get round that with a kludge, for example, I created an
> imaginary person called "<my-surname> SURNAME" and attached dates and
> maps to him.
>
> Doug

I might be mistaking, but it looks like you're describing something
entirely different. Maybe you're referring to the way in which family
trees can be visualized or to one of the printed or web reports?

What I was thinking about is this; each family tree maintained in Gramps
contains both time related information (e.g. dates of birth, of
marriage, of residence at some address, of residence at some other
address, of emigration, of immigration, of citizenship, of passing, and
what not). It may also contain location information (such as the names
of cities, towns and what not) as it pertains to each of the events. In
addition this post[1] suggests that it is or should be possible to
convert the names of those locations to geographic coordinates.

Now if there would be software that could take those pieces of
information and visualize them on a map as time progresses (using
functions such as play, reverse, forward, pause, etc.) it would be
possible to show the propagation of e.g. a specific last name in time
within e.g. a city or a country or the migration of individuals
belonging to a certain group (such as individuals with the same or a
similar last name).

I hope this clarifies any confusion that may exist regarding this post.

Regards, Jk.

[1] https://sourceforge.net/p/gramps/mailman/message/35634223/

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Re: Tools for the visualition of Gramps data.

Gary Griffin
If you had Lat/Lon on all of your places in Gramps and exported as CSV (include place data) , then you would have a list of Individuals with birth/baptism/death/burial date and place as well as marriage date and place. You would have to reformat this into a simple list such as Event Type, Event Date, Lat, Lon . You could take this new data file and import into Carto and generate an animated time series over a map. I filed 0009945 to fix the CSV export so that it could be easier to do place lookups from the event data in the export. I did a Proof of Concept - it took about an hour or two and worked with just these events. You could filter to look at only birth events, for instance. I am not aware of a way to export other events (like residence, which could take a date range). And not sure how meaningful the result would be. Gary
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Re: Tools for the visualition of Gramps data.

John W. Kitz-3
Garry,

On 2017-02-11 03:39, Gary Griffin wrote:

> If you had Lat/Lon on all of your places in Gramps and exported as
> CSV (include place data) , then you would have a list of Individuals
> with birth/baptism/death/burial date and place as well as marriage
> date and place. You would have to reformat this into a simple list
> such as Event Type, Event Date, Lat, Lon . You could take this new
> data file and import into Carto [1] and generate an animated time
> series over a map. I filed 0009945 [2] to fix the CSV export so that
> it could be easier to do place lookups from the event data in the
> export. I did a Proof of Concept - it took about an hour or two and
> worked with just these events. You could filter to look at only birth
> events, for instance. I am not aware of a way to export other events
> (like residence, which could take a date range). And not sure how
> meaningful the result would be. Gary
>
> -------------------------
>  View this message in context: Re: Tools for the visualition of Gramps
> data. [3]
> Sent from the GRAMPS - User mailing list archive [4] at Nabble.com.
>
> Links:
> ------
> [1] https://carto.com/
> [2] https://gramps-project.org/bugs/view.php?id=9945
> [3]
> http://gramps.1791082.n4.nabble.com/Tools-for-the-visualition-of-Gramps-data-tp4678730p4678904.html
> [4] http://gramps.1791082.n4.nabble.com/GRAMPS-User-f1807095.html

Thanks for taking the time to respond and for your suggestions. I was
hoping some tool would be available that can downloaded, installed and
used on a Wintel workstation free of charge as well as be community
developed and maintained.

Assuming you have experience using Carto could you please let me know if
what I'm looking for can be accomplished using the service option that
is being advertised as free of charges or if that would require
functionality that would incur a fee?

Regards, Jk.

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Re: Tools for the visualition of Gramps data.

Doug-11
In reply to this post by John W. Kitz-3
On 10/02/17 11:37, John W. Kitz wrote:

> Doug,
>
> On 2017-01-31 15:55, Doug wrote:
>> On 27/01/17 15:56, John W. Kitz wrote:
>>> Hi,
>>>
>>> This is probably a question for the more seasoned Gramps
>>> users out there;
>>> one of the features of Gramps is that it can be used to
>>> store location
>>> information as it relates to other information stored in
>>> Gramps, such as
>>> data representative of time through the recording of life
>>> events such as
>>> births, marriages, deaths, burials, etc.
>>>
>>> Are there any users that have experience with and can
>>> thus recommend any,
>>> preferably free and relatively easy to use, software that
>>> can be used to
>>> visualize such data e.g. as it pertains to the
>>> propagation of a specific
>>> last name in time within e.g. a city or a country or to
>>> the migration of
>>> individuals belonging to a certain group (individuals
>>> with a similar name)
>>> in time and space?
>>>
>>> Regards, Jk.
>>
>> I have experience with the problem but not with any
>> software that can
>> quickly solve it for you.
>> When I was doing this, it was with a much earlier version
>> of gramps
>> and it involved a lot of manual work. Now that things have
>> moved on,
>> maybe others can help.
>>
>> I'd just comment that gramps in any case is not well
>> designed for
>> dealing with all people with the same surname as a group,
>> when it
>> comes to things like the Narweb report.
>> You can get round that with a kludge, for example, I
>> created an
>> imaginary person called "<my-surname> SURNAME" and
>> attached dates and
>> maps to him.
>>
>> Doug
>
> I might be mistaking, but it looks like you're describing
> something entirely different. Maybe you're referring to the
> way in which family trees can be visualized or to one of the
> printed or web reports?
>
> What I was thinking about is this; each family tree
> maintained in Gramps contains both time related information
> (e.g. dates of birth, of marriage, of residence at some
> address, of residence at some other address, of emigration,
> of immigration, of citizenship, of passing, and what not).
> It may also contain location information (such as the names
> of cities, towns and what not) as it pertains to each of the
> events. In addition this post[1] suggests that it is or
> should be possible to convert the names of those locations
> to geographic coordinates.
>
> Now if there would be software that could take those pieces
> of information and visualize them on a map as time
> progresses (using functions such as play, reverse, forward,
> pause, etc.) it would be possible to show the propagation of
> e.g. a specific last name in time within e.g. a city or a
> country or the migration of individuals belonging to a
> certain group (such as individuals with the same or a
> similar last name).
>
> I hope this clarifies any confusion that may exist regarding
> this post.
>
> Regards, Jk.
>
> [1] https://sourceforge.net/p/gramps/mailman/message/35634223/
>


Sorry, John. On re-reading I see that I was indeed
misunderstanding your post.

Doug

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Re: Tools for the visualition of Gramps data.

Gary Griffin
In reply to this post by John W. Kitz-3
I never used Carto until I saw this question. I used the free version only.

The whole key is to
A) export the data from Gramps - this is easy. I created some filters to export only one name (with its derivatives). In my case I used the filter : Person Filter - Full Family Name: ^str[^b]*b[^l]*l

This means: starts with STR, then has anything but B, then B, then anything but L ,then L.
This matches STR*B*L to catch Strabala, Strabley, Stroble, Stroebele etc.

B) massage the data into a simple CSV list of the fields you really want. I did this work in a spreadsheet as a one-off. I pulled the Birth/Death/Burial/Marriage data that had both a specific date and a location. Then I did a lookup of the location for the Lat/Lon. Then I created a new CSV file with the data. I did not care about the name of the person. I did include the Event type in case I wanted to look only at Birth or Death. The fields I used were Event Type, Event Date, Event Location, Event Lat, Event Lon. I didnt need the Event Location, but kept just in case.

C) Import CSV in to Carto. Carto is fairly straightforward to use - there are lots of youtube videos. You want a Style=Animation. You can make both dot plots (event lights up like lightbulb and then goes out) or accumulate the dots so you can watch the new dots but still see the old dots.