media organization

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media organization

Richard Troxel
I'm a little embarrassed to raise this question but I could really use some suggestions right now. For a long time I have just raced ahead building my database with too little attention paid to organization. The paper work is in fairly good shape but the photos are all dumped into one folder on my computer. I would like to be able to use the various media tools in Gramps to help me. Mostly I just want to rename my files using a standardized format. If I just rename a file I must turn around and open Gramps and reconnect the link. It would expedite the whole process if there was a way in the Gramps media editor to not only give the photo a title but to also rename the source file without losing the relative path. A "one stop" pass if you will. Failing that, I could use some other suggestions before I just have to tough it out.


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Re: media organization

Peter Merchant
On 02/08/2019 04:14, Richard Troxel wrote:
I'm a little embarrassed to raise this question but I could really use some suggestions right now. For a long time I have just raced ahead building my database with too little attention paid to organization. The paper work is in fairly good shape but the photos are all dumped into one folder on my computer. I would like to be able to use the various media tools in Gramps to help me. Mostly I just want to rename my files using a standardized format. If I just rename a file I must turn around and open Gramps and reconnect the link. It would expedite the whole process if there was a way in the Gramps media editor to not only give the photo a title but to also rename the source file without losing the relative path. A "one stop" pass if you will. Failing that, I could use some other suggestions before I just have to tough it out.


We had a long discussion on this about the 29th of April, called  'workflow ideas' with input from the people who are very particular about doing it properly and people like me who are trying to keep it simple and readable. I have cut and pasted a bit of it here because I don't know how to add a link to the on-line discussion yet.

"Formal citations would use the references as defined by the associated archive, Peter -- also identifying the specific archive, of course -- but usually supplemented with written details such as personal names, dates, district/locality, etc. This would be Elizabeth Shown Mills' recommendation, and the extra information would serve as a backup if the reference was in error. I know many of us UK folk take shortcuts because these codes are very well-defined, and our census search engines have to accommodate a search-by-code. Also, because those recommendations may seem too verbose.  :-)

However, note that there's a difference between how you organise your materials (images, documents, etc), and how you index them. Your suggested file naming is a very common approach, but it falls down for items that mention multiple names, places, and dates (e.g. probate documents). I am sorry to say that I recently had a rant about this (https://parallax-viewpoint.blogspot.com/2019/01/organising-more-resources.html) because a number of writers with archival experience -- who should know better -- were recommending it, when it clearly clashed with their own approach with physical items in an archive. As a person with a strong IT background, I had to put the record straight.

Tony

On 29/04/2019 10:57, Peter Merchant wrote:
Ouch, I can see that I have a lot of retrospective work to do to record things that other people can recreate. My practice has been to rename all downloaded items  as date-event-person i.e. '1891-census-william Merchant' and thus losing the other identification details. I'll have to find them again and perhaps edit the pic to add the text to it.

But thanks to all for the interesting discussion here.

Peter M.

On 29/04/2019 09:46, Tony Proctor wrote:

Re: Q1: TNA has a comprehensive scheme for cataloguing all the materials it holds, and they publish recommendations for how it should be used to cite their materials at Citing Documents. For the censuses, this amounts to using the departmental code, series number, piece number, and book number (for 1841) for the specific census "item"; and then internal identifiers of folio and page number to identify a specific page within that item. For instance, ‘HO 107/11/12, folio 12, page 19’ in 1841, or ‘RG 9/2460, fo. 43, p. 27’ in 1861. Ranges of consecutive page numbers are conventionally represented as n1n2, where the separator is a n-dash character. NB: this scheme also applies to BMD registrations."


--- end of cutting. Not an answer, but food for thought.

Peter M.



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Fwd: media organization

Richard Troxel

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Richard Troxel <[hidden email]>
Date: Fri, Aug 2, 2019, 4:19 AM
Subject: Re: [Gramps-users] media organization
To: Peter Merchant <[hidden email]>


Thank you Peter for your excellent suggestions. Unfortunately, they don't resolve my delema of having to break the media link and then reconnect to the renamed files. 1. Is there a tool in Gramps? or 2. Is there a method to export the media data, enter the amended file names and then import the new data? or, 3) any other suggestions?

On Thu, Aug 1, 2019, 11:53 PM Peter Merchant <[hidden email]> wrote:
On 02/08/2019 04:14, Richard Troxel wrote:
I'm a little embarrassed to raise this question but I could really use some suggestions right now. For a long time I have just raced ahead building my database with too little attention paid to organization. The paper work is in fairly good shape but the photos are all dumped into one folder on my computer. I would like to be able to use the various media tools in Gramps to help me. Mostly I just want to rename my files using a standardized format. If I just rename a file I must turn around and open Gramps and reconnect the link. It would expedite the whole process if there was a way in the Gramps media editor to not only give the photo a title but to also rename the source file without losing the relative path. A "one stop" pass if you will. Failing that, I could use some other suggestions before I just have to tough it out.


We had a long discussion on this about the 29th of April, called  'workflow ideas' with input from the people who are very particular about doing it properly and people like me who are trying to keep it simple and readable. I have cut and pasted a bit of it here because I don't know how to add a link to the on-line discussion yet.

"Formal citations would use the references as defined by the associated archive, Peter -- also identifying the specific archive, of course -- but usually supplemented with written details such as personal names, dates, district/locality, etc. This would be Elizabeth Shown Mills' recommendation, and the extra information would serve as a backup if the reference was in error. I know many of us UK folk take shortcuts because these codes are very well-defined, and our census search engines have to accommodate a search-by-code. Also, because those recommendations may seem too verbose.  :-)

However, note that there's a difference between how you organise your materials (images, documents, etc), and how you index them. Your suggested file naming is a very common approach, but it falls down for items that mention multiple names, places, and dates (e.g. probate documents). I am sorry to say that I recently had a rant about this (https://parallax-viewpoint.blogspot.com/2019/01/organising-more-resources.html) because a number of writers with archival experience -- who should know better -- were recommending it, when it clearly clashed with their own approach with physical items in an archive. As a person with a strong IT background, I had to put the record straight.

Tony

On 29/04/2019 10:57, Peter Merchant wrote:
Ouch, I can see that I have a lot of retrospective work to do to record things that other people can recreate. My practice has been to rename all downloaded items  as date-event-person i.e. '1891-census-william Merchant' and thus losing the other identification details. I'll have to find them again and perhaps edit the pic to add the text to it.

But thanks to all for the interesting discussion here.

Peter M.

On 29/04/2019 09:46, Tony Proctor wrote:

Re: Q1: TNA has a comprehensive scheme for cataloguing all the materials it holds, and they publish recommendations for how it should be used to cite their materials at Citing Documents. For the censuses, this amounts to using the departmental code, series number, piece number, and book number (for 1841) for the specific census "item"; and then internal identifiers of folio and page number to identify a specific page within that item. For instance, ‘HO 107/11/12, folio 12, page 19’ in 1841, or ‘RG 9/2460, fo. 43, p. 27’ in 1861. Ranges of consecutive page numbers are conventionally represented as n1n2, where the separator is a n-dash character. NB: this scheme also applies to BMD registrations."


--- end of cutting. Not an answer, but food for thought.

Peter M.

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Re: Fwd: media organization

Nick Hall
On 02/08/2019 12:21, Richard Troxel wrote:
> Is there a tool in Gramps?

Use the Media Verify tool in the third-party addons repository.

It uses generated checksums of media files under the base path for
relative media to locate files that have been renamed or moved.

Nick.




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Re: Fwd: media organization

enno
In reply to this post by Richard Troxel

Hello Richard,

Thank you Peter for your excellent suggestions. Unfortunately, they don't resolve my delema of having to break the media link and then reconnect to the renamed files. 1. Is there a tool in Gramps? or 2. Is there a method to export the media data, enter the amended file names and then import the new data? or, 3) any other suggestions?

Yes, there is a Media Verify Tool. It can generate hashes (fingerprints) for all your media, and when you move and/or rename those, it can find them again by their hashes, and fix their paths.

This means that, after you have used this tool to generate the hashes, you can exit Gramps, move/rename your media with your standard file manager, and then start the tool in Gramps to verify and fix.

Note that this may fail if you use an external tool to add tags or other data to the media files themselves, because they changed the contents, so that the hashes will fail.

I suggest to try this on a couple of known files, keeping notes for their old and new names and locations, to get an idea of how the tool works.

And create a backup first.

Regards,

Enno




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Re: Fwd: media organization

Peter Merchant

> And create a backup first.
>
>
MOST IMPORTANT BIT OF ADVICE THAT YOU WILL EVER GET.

P.



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Re: media organization

GRAMPS - User mailing list
In reply to this post by Peter Merchant
Here's the 29th of April 'workflow ideas' gramps-users maillist archive thread you referenced:



Referencing a thread from the Gramps-users archive:


2) Search the subject line of the thread
  (A list of the individual replies is displayed)

3) Open the kickoff message of the maillist discussion

4) At the bottom of the message, copy the "View entire thread" link address

5) Introduce the reference in your reply & paste the link.

-Brian

On Fri, Aug 2, 2019 at 1:54, Peter Merchant
We had a long discussion on this about the 29th of April, called  'workflow ideas' with input from the people who are very particular about doing it properly and people like me who are trying to keep it simple and readable. 
I have cut and pasted a bit of it here because I don't know how to add a link to the on-line discussion yet.--



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Re: Fwd: media organization

Ron Johnson
In reply to this post by enno
On 8/2/19 6:43 AM, Enno Borgsteede wrote:

>
> Hello Richard,
>
>> Thank you Peter for your excellent suggestions. Unfortunately, they don't
>> resolve my delema of having to break the media link and then reconnect to
>> the renamed files. 1. Is there a tool in Gramps? or 2. Is there a method
>> to export the media data, enter the amended file names and then import
>> the new data? or, 3) any other suggestions?
>
> Yes, there is a Media Verify Tool. It can generate hashes (fingerprints)
> for all your media, and when you move and/or rename those, it can find
> them again by their hashes, and fix their paths.
>
> This means that, after you have used this tool to generate the hashes, you
> can exit Gramps, move/rename your media with your standard file manager,
> and then start the tool in Gramps to verify and fix.
>
> Note that this may fail if you use an external tool to add tags or other
> data to the media files themselves, because they changed the contents, so
> that the hashes will fail.
>
> I suggest to try this on a couple of known files, keeping notes for their
> old and new names and locations, to get an idea of how the tool works.
>
> And create a backup first.
>
> Regards,
>

Not just a tree backup, but the media directory.

--
Angular momentum makes the world go 'round.


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Re: Fwd: media organization

Richard Troxel
Thanks to all! I was ready to accept that there was no tool, I am very happy to be wrong. I have tested the tool (after making the appropriate backups) and found that it has worked very well.

Again, thank you all
Rich

On Fri, Aug 2, 2019 at 6:21 AM Ron Johnson <[hidden email]> wrote:
On 8/2/19 6:43 AM, Enno Borgsteede wrote:
>
> Hello Richard,
>
>> Thank you Peter for your excellent suggestions. Unfortunately, they don't
>> resolve my delema of having to break the media link and then reconnect to
>> the renamed files. 1. Is there a tool in Gramps? or 2. Is there a method
>> to export the media data, enter the amended file names and then import
>> the new data? or, 3) any other suggestions?
>
> Yes, there is a Media Verify Tool. It can generate hashes (fingerprints)
> for all your media, and when you move and/or rename those, it can find
> them again by their hashes, and fix their paths.
>
> This means that, after you have used this tool to generate the hashes, you
> can exit Gramps, move/rename your media with your standard file manager,
> and then start the tool in Gramps to verify and fix.
>
> Note that this may fail if you use an external tool to add tags or other
> data to the media files themselves, because they changed the contents, so
> that the hashes will fail.
>
> I suggest to try this on a couple of known files, keeping notes for their
> old and new names and locations, to get an idea of how the tool works.
>
> And create a backup first.
>
> Regards,
>

Not just a tree backup, but the media directory.

--
Angular momentum makes the world go 'round.


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Re: media organization

StoltHD
In reply to this post by Richard Troxel
One thing many people forget or don't know is that most file format can hold their own metadata and that users actually can alter and add this by using the OS build in file handler... Windows Explorer on Windows, Finder on Mac, and most tools that can read write files on Linux/BSD I think...

So even if you have a Naming Structure that only show the Original Archives Identifiers, you can add metadata to the files (Keywords, Captions, Descriptions and more) to identify anything that's in that file, i.e. Persons, Addresses, Type of Source, even Occupations and Residences... And if you want to go all the way you can actually copy a transcribed text to the Description field... Its not "only"...

For more Advanced usage, you should use a DAM (like DigiKam, multiple others are out there that also handles pdf and other doc formats)... or a Document and Citation Tool like  Zotero, Mendelay, or JabRef, none of them use the Metadata fields, but they have there own metadata fields where you add information, and the software creates the citations (the short explanation)...
By using the Metadata of the files, the information you add will be searchable on any Modern Operating System that have a extended search function...

and when using this metod, you can store files by i.e. Country/Repositories/Archives/.../.../..
And you can add additional information about i.e. where you can find digital copies of the original and so on in the Metadata Fields...

Sadly there are at the moment no genealogy software that I am aware of that read files metadata, but the information will stay, even if you copy the file to another location, send a copy by email... and maybe, some day, someone make a Gramplet that read this metadata...



I agree that it would be great if Gramps had a file handler that could rename and move/copy files, and if it also had the possibility to read/write metadata to the files directly from the Media Handler it would be great... another function I wish for is that I could have read Annotations from PDF's and that the text was copied to a Note in Gramps for that Document...This is a little out of the Scope of Gramps, but it would have been great to have this feature... 

fre. 2. aug. 2019 kl. 05:15 skrev Richard Troxel <[hidden email]>:
I'm a little embarrassed to raise this question but I could really use some suggestions right now. For a long time I have just raced ahead building my database with too little attention paid to organization. The paper work is in fairly good shape but the photos are all dumped into one folder on my computer. I would like to be able to use the various media tools in Gramps to help me. Mostly I just want to rename my files using a standardized format. If I just rename a file I must turn around and open Gramps and reconnect the link. It would expedite the whole process if there was a way in the Gramps media editor to not only give the photo a title but to also rename the source file without losing the relative path. A "one stop" pass if you will. Failing that, I could use some other suggestions before I just have to tough it out.
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